Masked doctor

Seeded amid the many surprises of COVID times, some unexpected positives

The Gazette recently contacted experts to ask about a few surprising, unanticipated positives that have emerged midst pandemic. In the area of health care delivery, almost 90 percent of the visits at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center’s primary care practice had to switch to telephone or video interviews which makes for fully open and transparent communication even more important. (Harvard Gazette, February 18, 2021)

COVID-19 Vaccine

Do I qualify? Vaccine confusion for patients with multiple serious medical conditions

As Massachusetts and several other states prioritize vaccine distribution to residents with cancer, heart disease, obesity and other medical concerns, many are still trying to figure out if they qualify as criteria with these diseases remain unclear. Sean Levy, MD of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, noted some eligible risk factors like smoking are open to interpretation. (WBUR, February 18, 2021)

COVID-19 Vaccine

How soon will COVID-19 vaccines return life to normal?

In the fight toward herd COVID-19 immunity, Dan Barouch, MD, PhD of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, spoke to the importance of vaccine-induced T cell responses, particularly for resistant variants that might partially evade neutralizing antibodies. (Science Magazine, February 16, 2021)

Masked doctor

4 ways for physicians to overcome the perfectionist mindset

As COVID-19 continues to devastate the country, physician burnout remains an ongoing issue. Alexa Kimball, MD, MPH, President & CEO of Harvard Medical Faculty Physicians at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, shared tips to develop self-awareness and overcome perfectionist tendencies to battle physician burnout. (American Medical Association, February 16, 2021)

Masked doctor

Hospital CEO: Start making routine doctor’s visits

As fewer people see their doctors for routine visits during the pandemic, the number of cancer diagnoses at BILH-affiliated health care providers dropped 20%. Phil Cormier, President of Beverly & Addison Gilbert Hospitals, noted those cancers did not disappear, just did not get diagnosed. (Gloucester Daily Times, February 11, 2021)